ImproveCareNow Community_conference


Notes from the Field - The ICN Engagement Campaign

What does an engagement campaign have to do with a healthcare quality improvement network? ImproveCareNow leaders were wondering the exact same thing before we began learning from our friends at 270 Strategies (experts in both political and issue campaigns!) Their team is teaching us how to apply successful campaign strategies to engage a large and diverse community of people in helping kids with IBD get better, now. Quite simply, ImproveCareNow invites clinicians, parents, patients, researchers, and others to learn about our work and to lend their time, talents, and expertise so together we can learn and find innovative new ways to outsmart IBD. And right now we’re learning how to make it easy for everyone to connect with ImproveCareNow in the ways that work best for them and ensure we can harness and value each person’s unique and generous contributions - making it meaningful and rewarding to be a part of our community.

ICN is made up of many faces. This slide shows a just a few of them.In ImproveCareNow we always start with a small test. To that end six of our centers are diving in as campaign pilot centers. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Levine Children’s Hospital, and the University of Michigan CS Mott Children’s Hospital are getting some training, rolling up their sleeves, and re-framing what an ICN IBD team looks and feels like. You will hear more about their journeys in the coming months as they build momentum and start sharing what they have learned with the rest of the community. In the meantime, we wanted to highlight some of the work underway in the early days of the campaign so that you can begin to learn with us now:

Snowflakes and ImproveCareNow


Campaign pilot centers are beginning to reframe their ICN teams with the “snowflake model” in mind. The snowflake model is a way of organizing people that decentralizes leadership and increases two-way communication. Basically it makes it easier for everyone to share the work and contribute to the success. These centers have found that creating a snowflake does not necessarily mean more work for the existing team, rather, it often involves reassigning people in ways that make it easier to get existing work done more efficiently.

This slide shows a diagram of what a snowflake staffing model would look like at an ICN Care Center.

“Hard ask?” – that sounds hard!


As part of their training, the participating centers are learning that it’s OK to be really direct about what they need from potential partners. It is lot easier to say no when the ask is soft and non-specific. So rather than saying “Umm…I was thinking maybe you could help us out somehow in the next few months,” they are looking for ways to be very concrete when asking for help, “Please come to our QI meeting next Tuesday. We really need your input on our new diagnosis process.” Coordinator Cori Davis tweeted about her first hard ask. The answer was YES!

Everyone’s story matters, and is important, and can change someone else's story.


More than ever, we are seeing how stories are key to helping potential partners understand what ImproveCareNow is all about and how they can fill important gaps in the community. Our Spring Community Conference is just around the corner and we are seeing some inspiring stories as part of the pre-work, stories that make very clear just how much our Network attracts those who want to join in and become a part of our success.

Elizabeth Monti shares her ICN story.

What this means to patients and families.


We know that growing our community will only make us stronger…indeed, the theme of our Spring Community Conference is “Strength in Our Numbers”! In her beautifully written LOOP post ‘Breaking a Promise’ Sami Kennedy really drove this point home. She reminded us why being part of ImproveCareNow is important and empowering for individuals, just as it is important to the whole community. As she says, “I have been welcomed into an environment where I am encouraged to not only sit at the table, but also to stand up and address the whole room.” Sami and Jennie

Meanwhile, we still have a lot to learn.


As the campaign unfolds, the ImproveCareNow leadership team knows it has an enormous responsibility to continue to ensure the network’s success, and to help develop a system that offers tools and opportunities for co-producing health and real partnerships. And we will be the first to admit, we have a lot to learn! We need your input as we go. We want to have open, transparent discussions about the challenges and opportunities ahead so we hope to engage more of you on twitter and other social media venues to take part in an ongoing dialogue between Community Conferences and webinars. You can follow @myers3411, @michaelseid11, @PeterAMargolis, and @improvecarenow on twitter and weigh in with your feedback and concerns as we build a bigger, better community together.

Sarah Myers tweets about the work of co-producing the conference agenda for the Spring 2015 Community Conference (#ICNCC15S)


Breaking a Promise

When Jennie and I applied to represent the Patient Advisory Council for ImproveCareNow as PAC Scholars in 2012, we were asked to each write an essay on our expectations and goals. I read mine over in December before I jumped on a plane to Orlando - more on that later.

I wrote in my essay, way back in 2012, a list of promises I would keep if I could just please go to a Learning Session. Paramount on that list was this: "I will listen more than I will speak." Because that's what patients do, right? I had the distinct feeling that I would be an intruder in a place where patients don't belong - and let me be clear that no one in ImproveCareNow made me feel this way; my stereotyped idea of what it meant to be a patient did.

"I will listen more than I will speak." This was my perception: it was okay for patients to sit at the table. To sit, to listen, but to speak? How could I? I was nineteen. I was a patient. What could I possibly have to share?

There is a time for listening, absolutely. But there is also a time for speaking - for all to speak. I had no concept of that as a young patient. I couldn't imagine myself having any sort of expertise that would help improve the healthcare system, even as I navigated it constantly. I figured I'd be there as an observer, to bring back insights to share with other patients about ImproveCareNow's work to help kids recover from, and more so, avoid flares of their IBD. Observer is the word I would have chosen to describe my responsibilities there.

IMG_2301 PAC Co-Chairs, then PAC Scholars, Jennie David (left) and Sami Kennedy (right) at their first ImproveCareNow Learning Session, October 2012.

Since my first Learning Session in the fall of 2012, I have been to five more. At each of them I have listened with a tape recorder running in my mind every second of every day, but I have also come home with a hoarse voice. Observer? No. I am so much more. No one at the Learning Session is just an observer - whether a long-time veteran or a special guest. Look at the buzz generated on Twitter (while you're at it, check out #icncc15s!) if you don't believe me.

I love to tell the story from my second Learning Session. To give you some context I am still nineteen here, and I've never before presented anything, anywhere, outside of a classroom. I was involved in a Q&A after a presentation I co-led with a physician and psychologist on medication adherence. A psychologist, physician, and patient together giving a presentation - I couldn't have imagined that just six months earlier! A physician in the audience posed a question to me regarding how I felt adherence could be effectively encouraged in patients my age. I gave my best answer, and he responded with his opinion based on his experiences, which happened not to be congruent with mine. We conversed for a few minutes; others chimed in. It was fascinating, thrilling, magical; I don't know if I can point to a better real-life definition of active collaboration.

After the session, this same physician hurried up to me at the podium. "I'm sorry," he said.

Wait, he said what?!

"I'm sorry," he said.

I asked him to clarify, very confused, and he explained that he worried he had made me uncomfortable by challenging my opinion as a patient. In fact, he had done just the opposite. This was my ImproveCareNow "lightbulb" moment.

Screen shot 2013-10-25 at 2.42.09 PM Sami (left) with former PAC Chair Jill (right) and ImproveCareNow project coordinator Molly (center) at the Spring 2013 Learning Session.

I have been asked countless times: how did you become who you are, a young patient leader? How do we get our patients to be like you? I am not sure this is the question we should be asking - because it assumes I am extraordinary. I know I am different; I have done things few other patients my age have - but it is not me that is extraordinary. I have been welcomed into an environment where I am encouraged to not only sit at the table, but also to stand up and address the whole room.

ImproveCareNow is an extraordinary community - a community with an ever-growing number of parents and patients being handed the mic - being asked to do things that were never before possible. This physician hadn't made me uncomfortable, no, not at all - he had made me comfortable. Our conversation erased all doubt from my mind that I was there for show; I was there for the same reason as him.

I wish I could convey to you how incredible that felt - and how sad I feel in retrospect that feeling included, truly included, had to feel incredible because it was so unusual.

I told that very story twice in 2014 to two very amazing audiences - first, to executives from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and, second, to healthcare leaders and learners at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement National Forum - the reason I took that flight to Orlando. I presented the Patient Advisory Council to each and, in each case, asked them to imagine collaborating with patients. I told them about the promise I made before my very first Learning Session, and how I have broken it over and over again.

IHI Conference Dec 9 2014 - Sami presentation photo Sami presenting the PAC at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement National Forum in December 2014.

There is a time for listening, and there is a time for speaking. For all to speak, and all to listen.

I found out in the fall I've been accepted to medical school, and I'm still trying to figure out what it will mean for me to be both a patient advocate and a medical student. But here is what I do know: I can't really imagine myself practicing in a system without ImproveCareNow and networks like it that I hope will be just as successful for other conditions. I want to be a physician who makes my younger self proud. One who doesn't just repair broken things, but creates things that are better. One who is brave enough to say and show that everyone has expertise, taking patient and family engagement to the places ImproveCareNow has, where it can be frightening to go. I see networks following in the footsteps of ImproveCareNow as the foundation of how I hope to practice - and how I have to practice. This is not only creating health for kids with IBD; this is making the whole system healthier.

Of course I am scared as I figure out a new set of expectations - but, this time, I don't expect to be silent.


#ICNCC15S

https://twitter.com/Sarituno/status/560137404838051840


Gutsy 3 & 4 Take On The Learning Session!

As this year's PAC Scholars Bianca and I (Isabelle) got to go to the 2014 Fall Learning Session in Chicago. We had such a great time and just wanted to share some of our thoughts about the LS before, during and afterwards!The 2014-15 PAC Scholars Bianca & Isabelle

Before:


Isabelle: Leading up to the Learning session I was so excited! There were so many texts and e-mails and many plans to be made (plane tickets, hotel rooms, and most importantly snack choices). As it got closer I was a little nervous, as I am the only one of the PAC representatives who had never been to a Learning Session before, but mostly I was just so excited to see/meet my fellow PAC leaders and so many others!

Bianca: Before the Learning Session I was super excited to see everyone again and be able to meet my fellow PAC Scholar, Isabelle! Since I had already been to a few Learning Sessions, I knew what to expect (how busy it is, the amount of new people I would be meeting,etc.), but I was looking forward to working on a different level with the PAC. Before the Learning Session, I got to help out with the pre-work. "Grading" each center's vision for their ideal treatment center and picking my favorites was a lot of fun. I loved reading how big every center's dreams were for their own perfect IBD center.

During:


Isabelle: I met so many interesting people. It was so amazing how nice and down-to-earth everyone was, including the big-shot doctors. They all introduced themselves by their first names and seemed genuinely interested in hearing about where I go to school, what I am studying and my dreams for my future and the future of the PAC. There were many planning sessions with just the PAC and it really got me excited about our future projects and being in the Learning Session environment helped make those projects feel connected to a larger purpose.

Bianca: During the Learning Session, I met so many more people than I had anticipated! It was great to be able to formally meet everyone and see how passionate each and every center is. I also got to spend a lot of time with Isabelle, Jennie, and Sami, which was awesome to get to know them on a different level, rather than throught text/emails. The past few Learning Sessions I had been to were nice and helpful, but I like to be more involved, so this Learning Session was by far the best!

After:


Isabelle: I made so many connections and learned a lot about ICN at the Learning Session. It was a lot to take in but I really enjoyed the entire event and can’t wait to go back again, this time with even more knowledge heading into it. Meeting my fellow PAC leaders Jennie and Bianca and of course seeing Sami again was so much fun and I feel like I am so close with all of them already. I am very excited for our future and the future of ICN!

Bianca: Afterwards, I was beyond excited for what this year would bring. This LS was great becuase, like I said, I got to spend a lot of time with the PAC leadership, being introduced into the PAC leadership position, setting goals, ordering room service, and just hanging out with each other.  Though the few days were fun and enjoyable, things did get hectic at times, but overall a great, well spent, work filled weekend. I cannot wait until the next LS, because the experience of each Learning Session is like no other - the connections made, the work being done, and of course the laughs and tears shared. I am beyond excited for this year!


Learning & Leading Together

When I’m not leading improvement activities in the ImproveCareNow network, I’m busy raising a family. As a parent of young kids, I do a lot of bedtime reading. Recently, I was reading The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince) by Antione de St. Exupery to Finn, who is 7. After a few pages, Finn just wanted to go back to his other book (I will have to try again in a few years!) but it made me want to reread it after a long time.

 

This quote appears not far into the book:




"Grown-ups love figures...When you tell them you've made a friend they never ask you any questions about essential matters. They never say to you "What does his voice sound like? What game does he love best? Does he collect butterflies? Instead they demand "How old is he? How much does he weigh? How much money does his father make? Only from these figures do they think they have learned anything about him."

 

As ImproveCareNow builds an awareness and engagement campaign aimed at bringing many, many more patient and parent partners into our work, we have such wonderful models for storytelling about the “essential matters”—the story of the whole person, not just the figures like lab results, medications, and BMI. Our Patient Advisory Council (PAC) members so often share their stories as people, not just patients. They articulate their journey with IBD in ways that are wise beyond their years and make us pause and think about how we can try to be wiser and learn from them. Our Parent Working Group members have challenged us to see their children’s whole lives and faces when we look at the data we use to drive improvements. And our colleagues at Empowered by Kids are using their amazing commitment and individual talents to reach other families who need to expand their own “village.”

 

I am off to Chicago tomorrow for the ImproveCareNow Fall Learning Session. Learning Sessions are a time to celebrate the achievements of the past six months, but also to ponder how best to leverage the strengths of our community to do even more together. The essential questions for us now are: How will this Learning Health System reach and engage and partner with many more parents and patients? How can we pair the right people with the right action – bringing new energy and perspectives to how we run the whole network, and how things are done at each individual care center?

 

We know we will be even better at achieving our aims (the most important of which is getting more and more kids into remission!) with more people working with us, sharing their experience and talents and perspective. So as we plot out next steps for ImproveCareNow, I think we need to stay focused not only on “figures”, but also on “essential matters”. Our many parent, patient and clinician partners are already teaching us the importance and the impact of a story. I know I can’t wait to hear from—and really learn about—more and more of them.

 

The better we know each other, the easier it will be to create the future of ImproveCareNow together and to find joy in learning and leading together.

 

See you in Chicago!


As we prepare for #ICNLS

Fall 2014 ImproveCareNow Learning Session cover photoAs we prepare to bring together people from across the ImproveCareNow Network for our Fall 2014 Learning Session, I wanted to take a moment to share a few things with you.

Why we do what we do:





What's in store for Learning Session attendees: LS14F Final Agenda

And how can you join @improvecarenow and follow all the #icnls action on Twitter: 

If you are joining us at the Learning Session and will be tweeting, type your Twitter handle in the comments so we can be sure to follow you!

//


The PAC is Ready for ICNLS! Are YOU?

It seems like just yesterday the Spring Learning Session was around the corner! We're just FOURTEEN DAYS away from the 2014 Fall Learning Session - can you believe it!? As usual, the Patient Advisory Council (PAC) is excited, thankful, and busy preparing for the opportunity to contribute to the LS. Once again, the PAC Leadership is gearing up for busy and productive collaborations and presentations, and this time, we get to personally introduce two new PAC Scholars - Isabelle Linguiti and Bianca Siedlaczek!

14 days to go, 3 incredible days in Chicago, 2 amazing new PAC Scholars, and 1 fantastic session. Are you not excited yet!?

PAC1 PAC representatives showing off their gutsy spirit at the Spring 2014 Learning Session!

Just in case you aren't bursting with gutsy energy yet, we wanted to give you a preview of what to expect from our two new Scholars. These young ladies are intelligent, creative, passionate, and spunky. We asked them to tell us (and YOU!) a little bit about themselves and their ideas:

Isabelle, 19, Philadelphia

"I’ve been frustrated with communication between patients and doctors because I feel like they can often turn stressful when we already have enough to deal with. Rather than sitting there with my frustrations, I feel like ImproveCareNow gives me the ability to do something to change that."

Favorite Candy: Dark Chocolate

If I could travel anywhere, I would go to....Iceland! That was my one wish, and I got to go!

In my free time, I like to....get creative and do art projects!

My role model is....my boss at CHOP. She herself has dealt with a lot with her health and is very successful. She wanted to help me succeed and has guided me every step of the way. She is very nice, and giving with her talent and time.

My ideas? "My vision for the Communications Task Force is to use it to create a program that allows patients to have a direct role in educating doctors on helpful listening and communication strategies when working with patients."

IMG_8076.a PAC members working hard at the Fall 2012 Learning Session (Back when we only needed half a table!)

Bianca, 15, Michigan

"I love that ImproveCareNow is more than just a collaborative effort between doctors and nurses; it involves patients, too!"

Favorite Candy: Sour Patch Kids

If I could travel anywhere, I would go to....Italy!

In my free time, I like to....take my dog on walks.

My role model is....my maternal grandpa. He is incredibly strong. He survived World War II before relocating from Italy to the United States and making a living for his family.

My Ideas? "Nurses have a lot of helpful knowledge and experience that would be helpful to PAC. Becoming more collaborative with the nurses of ICN can give the Advocacy taskforce another perspective for projects."


Data Quality Improvement

Monday mornings are supposed to be difficult. There’s no such thing as a “Case of the Thursdays.”  Dragging out of bed Monday morning is supposed to be hard. Some weeks it is. Just this March there was a week where it just wasn't. I’m not entirely certain I even hit the snooze button (gasp!). I had just spent my weekend, the American worker’s time for decompressing, in meetings. Lots of them. But these were not just your average meetings – they were the ImproveCareNow Learning Session meetings.

 

Following them, I arrived back in Cincinnati with renewed enthusiasm - a renewed enthusiasm that invariably comes from attending these sessions. See, I’m a data guy. We’re typically pretty black and white - no grey. We come to the table with preconceived notions of what’s going to work and what’s not. Clinical data managers are not usually innovators. They’re not expected to be. In many cases, they’re not allowed to be. I can tell you that they’re missing out. Fate or karma or luck or whatever steered me away from the world of highly regulated (read: robotic, monotonous, widget-producing) clinical trials work, toward ImproveCareNow where I find myself encouraged to not only be rigorous, but also innovative in my approach to nearly everything.

 

As ImproveCareNow’s data manager, I've seen things I never would have imagined. We've abandoned the old query-and-response method of data cleaning and replaced it with a Quality Improvement (QI) based method of data quality improvement. When I tell my old colleagues about this process, I get a range of responses from a polite you-know-better-than-that tap on the head with a smile and nod, to downright indignation. Many of my peers have expressed reservations and have been kind enough to tell me that my approach won’t work. This is how I know what we’re doing IS working.

 

Any time those that “know” tell me that I’m crazy, it’s time to push on. Why?  Because it works. In 3 years, we’ve been able to improve the quality of ImproveCareNow’s registry (database) in terms of completeness, accuracy and timeliness not by adding a mountain of burdensome queries and rework to the care centers’ already full plates, but by doing what we teach in this network. Becoming partners in data quality with the ImproveCareNow teams working hard at each center, by applying QI science to work and processes of our central data management team, and by applying the same QI methodologies that have enabled ImproveCareNow to raise remission rates to places we didn’t even think possible. We’re taking the quality of the data, and by extension the quality of the data-driven tools and improvement that are developed and implemented by care centers, to places we were told we couldn’t go.

 

I’m not naïve enough to think that anything we try is going to be a success. Quite the opposite. Part of the journey is stumbling, falling, getting back up and applying what we’ve learned. And that’s what makes it easy to drag myself out of bed on those Monday mornings and get right back to it.

 

Dan Jeffers, MS, CCDM is a certified clinical data manager working at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. When he’s not coming up with innovative ways to make the data in ICN2 even better, he’s chasing his kids and chickens around his Cincinnati farm.


DIGMA: Group Medical Appointments

In the decade I have lived with Crohn’s Disease, I have steadfastly steered clear of support groups. It always seemed as though I were resigned to a couple of options in talking about my Crohn’s: 1) stick with my private medical appointment with only my parents and doctor, or 2) cautiously venture into the mysterious world of support groups. I exclusively favored the first option, and carefully built my community of friends with IBD a la patient advocacy and volunteering. And while that strategy worked for me, I only recently realized there’s another way.When Sami and I were invited to participate in the Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters (“CHKD”) team’s demonstration of the group medical appointment (better known in the medical community as Drop-In Group Medical Appointments, “DIGMA”) at the ImproveCareNow Spring Learning Session, we were happy to help. We were admittedly unaware of how a DIGMA session worked; and arguably incredibly naïve about the feasibility and sustainability of a model that – at first glance – seemed to be the very kind of ooey-gooey-woe-is-me support group we had intentionally evaded.

 

Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters at the Spring 2014 Learning Session during their DIGMA demoChampioned by the passionate team at CHKD in Norfolk, Virginia, the DIGMA model has enjoyed strong support from clinicians and families alike. Dr. Marc Tsou was introduced to the idea in the late 90’s when a parent gave him an article about the group model structure, about which he says, “It seemed to make so much sense. I thought of how many times in the day I’d say the same medical information to several families. Say that information six times, how inefficient, then think about how much that group appointment concept makes sense.” Dr. Tsou saw an opportunity to meaningfully build on the clinic’s collaborative culture; “Elements were there, the right type of people and group. The doctors were the ones who said we’ve got to do this, we’ve got to do this, the time was right, it was almost fate.” Fueled by his fearless nurse, Terri, Dr. Tsou and the CHKD team set about bringing the DIGMA model to their IBD families.

 

The first step was reaching out to a variety of clinicians – such as dieticians and social workers – to ensure that the group visits did not just include patients & families, but also a group of diversified care providers. After sending out an email to potential clinician participants, positive responses began to rush in. “For the most part all responded and had someone to come and participate,” Terri says. “Everybody was super receptive to it, they’ve showed up at every one since.”

 

Annette Kulzer, a mom of three boys including 16-year-old Kolin who lives with IBD, has been instrumental in running the group model appointments. “As a parent,” she says. “It opens doors to meet people we would have not met. If we were in another setting, we wouldn’t hear those stories.” An early adopter and believer in the DIGMA model, Annette has regularly provided a parent’s perspective into how the group appointments run. For example, after a group appointment with female and male patients, Annette suggested having separate groups for each gender and for different ages ranges to encourage comfort and participation. Annette and Kolin emphasize the sincerity of Dr. Tsou’s malleability in running the group sessions, and they always appreciate the weight their feedback holds.

 

In addition to the accessibility to a variety of clinicians and retaining certain elements of the traditional solo medical appointment (e.g., a one-on-one physical exam), the DIGMA model had a surprising but welcome impact; it provided novel insight for patients, parents, and clinicians alike through storytelling. Annette remembers a teenage patient who recounted having great difficulty taking the bus to sporting events with her teammates, since she was worried she might urgently need to use the bathroom. The story challenged Annette to reconsider Kolin’s hesitation to ride with his teammates to a game, as she came to understand that her son – who rarely complained – shared a similar fear that had gone unspoken.

 

Jill, CHKD’s social worker agrees that sharing stories can be incredibly eye-opening, and says, “It’s very, very different when you can look into the face of another mom or another dad or another kid, and say I understand this. Okay here’s somebody like me, they’re doing alright.” Dr. Tsou adds, “There was one mom who broke down into tears, she got very emotional, you think gee these sessions no one will share very much, but really they’re sharing their souls and baring their deepest fears. People might be skeptical but it really happens, but that’s super gratifying, a bit surprising, and confirmed to us that we’re on to something and something that deserves the attention and energy to keep it going.” When asked about group session attendees who were unsure at first, Annette says, “We’ve had many patients and parents who come in resistant, but within 15 minutes they’ve had the Kool-Aid.”

 

The group session can also be liberating for patients, who perhaps fear that IBD will be an “albatross around their neck for the rest of their lives.” Kolin enthusiastically agrees, adding, “Telling people what you’re going through helps a lot.” Positive and on target support grows organically from the patient-driven and clinician-facilitated model, and Kolin says, “You’re going to get so much out of it.”

 

While the organizational burden was heavy at the beginning, the team has happily tackled logistical issues to provide this innovative practice to their patients. Dr. Tsou explains, “The group appointment allows for so much more sharing of feelings, fears, and that’s really what so many families want and need and it allows it in the framework of still providing care. We’ve all had to learn a little different way of doing it.” Terri adds, “No harm in trying something, and I would guarantee that if others tried this model, they wouldn’t go back, it really does impact patients and families.”

 

But the potential of the DIGMA model doesn’t stop there: the team sees practical applications to rural communities (i.e., being able to run a group session in a rural community to maximize patients who can be seen), and across medical specialties. Dr. Tsou says, “I think it’s going to be more mainstreamed. It is the way medicine will be practiced in the future, we’re at the leading edge of it, which is cool.” Kolin adds, “I really want it to spread. I was really skeptical of it at first, but I really do enjoy the DIGMA model.”

 

A group medical appointment is, at its core, a treasure chest for patients, families, and clinicians; the ability to offer a holistic, patient-centered, and team-approach to pediatric care is innovative and vital to the collaborative and transparent culture championed by ImproveCareNow. The passion, integrity, and dedication the CHKD team has for optimizing chronic illness care is not only evident, but most importantly completely contagious. “We’re all passionate about our patients,” says Terri. “We were born to do this, it’s been really wonderful. Everyone had the spirit, it was right for us.”

 

 Jennie


Sometimes you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone…


The announcement from Daniel McLinden that the ICN Exchange was back up.

 

Recently, the ICN Exchange needed to undergo maintenance unexpectedly for two days. Some people in the ImproveCareNow Network probably noticed it more than others. I know that as someone who has come to rely on it to keep up with what centers are working on and looking at, I was keenly aware of its absence.  So you can imagine how thrilling it was when it came back online!

 

Now that the Exchange is back up and running (and better than ever - with plans and resources in place to prevent such outages in the future!) it occurs to me that even a quick glance at the Exchange clearly shows the richness, diversity, vibrancy—and the multifaceted dynamics of our community.

 

When I glanced at the Exchange today this is what I saw:

 

Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters' DIGMA model demo video from the Spring 2014 Learning SessionImproveCareNow centers, like Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters, jumping in and collaborating with parents, patients, and other centers to make sure that we are all learning together!
Call for clinicians to sign up for a focus group to dicuss what has worked and what hasn't worked when trying to get patients and families involved in QI work at ImproveCareNow centers.

 

Opportunities that highlight how much we really, really want and need to learn from each other so we can collaborate even better!

 

The first ever announcement for a ImproveCareNow Dietician webinar Multidisciplinary partners, like the RD group, are staying connected with each other and getting organized so they can The new online 90 day goals tracker for ImproveCareNow centers to track and monitor their Improvement project goals and progress quarterlytake on projects that will build their visibility and leadership in ImproveCareNow.

 

ImproveCareNow QI teams are becoming even more accountable and transparent in their day-to-day QI work.

 

The Parent Working Group of ImproveCareNow is now setting and working on 90 Day Goals and in the spirit of transparency is sharing them with the whole NetworkParent Partners are setting their 90 day goals, tracking their progress and keeping the Network informed!The Patient Advisory Council request to ImproveCareNow participants to co-produce an Ostomy Toolkit for patients with permenant or temporary ostomies.

 

And finally, amazing patients around the country are teaching us more and more every day.


 

And that is just a quick glance! So thank you to everyone who has been a part of helping us build this vibrant community. I, for one, can’t wait to see where the community goes next!



The ICN Exchange is an internal knowledge-sharing platform that the ImproveCareNow Network uses to communicate, collaborate and innovate across the miles. Clinicians, Researchers, Patients, Families and Improvers are able to log into the ICN Exchange and share seamlessly and steal shamelessly!  The ICN Exchange has enabled ImproveCareNow to extend our “all teach, all learn” collaborative approach to medicine far beyond our monthly webinars and twice-annual Learning Session. It allows us to identify ideas and best practices in pediatric IBD care and introduce them into the care delivery process much faster—improving care for our patients now.


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