ImproveCareNow Patients_&_families


An update from the Patient Priorities team

ImproveCareNow has partnered with Patient PrioritiesThe IBD Learning Priorities project was designed to give young adults, parents and clinicians in the IBD community a chance to ask the questions they felt were most important in the treatment of IBD. Using an online survey, families and clinicians submitted over 200 questions - or 'learning objectives'. Common themes included diet, diagnosis and individual care needs.

 

 

 

These questions will help us further understand what information those who are impacted by IBD really need. We expect to find some of these questions already have answers. And where there there is good research to answer these common questions, ImproveCareNow will work to develop and share this knowledge through family-centered tools and resources. Those questions that do not have complete answers will help prioritize future pediatric IBD research.

 

Below are a few examples of the learning objectives received from families and clinicians like you!




    • Beyond enteral therapy, what is the role of diet in the maintenance of remission in IBD?

 

    • Is 6mp safe? Will it hurt her liver anymore than it already is?

 

    • We need more data on dual therapy with thiopurines and methotrexate. Specifically, will patients do better if these agents are started before starting biologics rather than starting them at the same time?



Stay connected with ImproveCareNow by joining our CIRCLE so we can send you updates on the continued progress of these important community-developed learning objectives and ensure you have access to the family-centered tools and information that are developed in response to some of these questions.


Buzzy: A small tool to help in a big way

Three years ago my son started on Humira in an attempt to get his Ulcerative Colitis into remission. Although it quickly became apparent that Humira was controlling his UC, my husband and I were struggling to successfully administer the drug. Our process consisted of 30 to 40 minutes of negotiation along with bribes and other unsuccessful attempts at minimizing the injection pain. We tried our best to allow our son to have some control over the situation by waiting for him to tell us when he was ready.  In the end, we were just getting frustrated.  That is when we found Buzzy.

 

Buzzy was developed by a physician and pain researcher (www.buzzy4shots.com).  It works on the Gate Control Theory of Pain. Its design confuses the nerves with both temperature and vibration. The theory is that this distracts from the injection pain and interrupts the neural pain pathways. Using Buzzy has reduced our shot time to 2-3 minutes and has greatly reduced the family stress and anxiety associated with this experience. I knew that we needed to make Buzzy accessible to all of our patients who receive injections or infusions to help with injection pain and needle phobia.  With a price tag of $40, our care team recognized that this purchase could be a burden on families already dealing with high medical costs.

 

Our Parent Mentoring Group at Riley Hospital for Children did research using the ICN database to determine the number of our patients that were using injections and infusions as their primary therapy.  We collected data from the infusion nurses and Child Life specialists that had been successfully using Buzzy in the hospital.  Armed with this data and personal experience, we prepared a grant that we submitted to the Women for Riley, a philanthropic group of women that support the Riley Hospital and Foundation.  Our group was then selected to present our grant to the review board.  In late February, we received word that we were awarded the grant to purchase 150 Deluxe Buzzy Kits to distribute to our patients.

 

Over the next year, we will be distributing these kits to this target group of patients and any new patients that start on infusions or injections.  We plan on surveying the recipients to gauge the effectiveness of this device. Our hope is that Buzzy will improve the time spent administering injections, lower family frustration, and reduce the overall pain of the injection. These kids go through so many procedures and experience so much pain with their diseases.  It is wonderful to have a small tool to help in a big way.

 

[Editor’s Note: This story was shared by Liz D - a mom of a three boys.  Her youngest son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at age 5.  She volunteers her time as a parent representative on the Riley Hospital for Children Parent Mentor Group, where she is an advocate for all families with IBD receiving care at Riley.  A mechanical engineer by trade, Liz has “retired” and loves her role as a full-time wife and mother.  This has also allowed her to pursue her love of all that is artistic and creative.  Over the past 12 years, she has taught both photography and memory preservation classes to both adults and kids.]


My Interview with Melida from the ICN Exchange Team



Melida, can you give us a professional snapshot of who you are?

I have an elevator speech, “My name is Melida, I am passionate about Information and Knowledge Management & Knowledge Creation within research communities.  I believe good data makes all the difference.”  I also have a professional identity:  Melida Busch, MLIS, and Director of Cincinnati Children’s Edward L. Pratt Research Library, of which I am proud. I work with the @ICNExchange team which provides me the pleasure of being connected to the ImproveCareNow community.



What will you be sharing at the Community Conference?
My colleague Sheryl Sheldon and I will be presenting on the use of the ICN Exchange as an empowering tool for all members of ICN to “share seamlessly and steal shamelessly”. The ICN community produces a lot of tools and resources, but until we use them, share them and improve them, they really aren’t very meaningful. We’re hoping to make our break-out session very practical, i.e. “This is how you use the ICN Exchange”, while reminding folks that it’s them and not the tools that make the ICN Exchange powerful. Hence the name for the session:  “You are How Data Becomes Knowledge”…

How does this session/focus pertain to parents?  Or how can parents use the information as part of our mission to help improve care.
Obviously partnering with patients and parents is a key tenant within the ImproveCareNow community. I think increasing both the amount and the diversity of the tools, resources and stories that patients and parents share on the ICN Exchange will have a direct impact on the improvement of care in the treatment of children with chronic IBD throughout the network.

Also, sharing in the commons increases your sphere of influence, not only in the potential number of people reached, but also in the ability of those whom you do not currently know to find your contributions later. You have the ability to make a big difference in your community long term, with what feels like such a small action.



 


Christian joins the Patient Advisory Council

PAC Member Christian HansenMy name is Christian Hanson and I am a sophomore at Brown University. I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at age ten and receive Remicade infusions at Boys Town Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. While Crohn’s so often feels like a heavy burden, there have been fleeting moments where my condition feels more like a blessing: Through this disease I have discovered a network of heroes who have overcome the trials of IBD and have been surrounded by a caring and compassionate network that spans the United States. I am joining the Patient Advocacy Council because I believe in their mission to magnify the voices of patients and advocate for those who cannot. I will be helping share, via CIRCLE eNewsletter, updates about the PAC and various projects related to patient engagement active throughout the ImproveCareNow Network. Feel free to contact me at [email protected] if you would like to learn more about the PAC or would like to speak with me regarding my personal experiences.


All the best,
Christian Hanson


What is Smart Patients? And why are we partnering?

Smart Patients logoThe team at Smart Patients has impressed us here at ImproveCareNow. They have proven themselves as experts in creating a culture and a space for generous, information-rich sharing which gives people living with chronic illnesses like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (Inflammatory Bowel Disease or IBD) a safe place to learn and share.

There are many social networks and online communities for IBD, but we have chosen to partner with the Smart Patients team because their custom-built, disease-specific forums offer a truly safe, warm and engaging experience for users. Smart Patients also offers conversation tagging, and clearly defined community norms, which means community members are highly likely to find the answers they need and highly unlikely to be trolled. And because the conversations are arranged using tags and completely searchable, you can always find what you’re looking for.

The Smart Patients team and ImproveCareNow have partnered to create an online IBD community that is supportive and also powerful. The Smart Patients IBD community has the power to improve health and health care systems through patient and family peer-to-peer learning.

Join the Smart Patients community for IBD today. Together, we can outsmart IBD!


Breaking a Promise

When Jennie and I applied to represent the Patient Advisory Council for ImproveCareNow as PAC Scholars in 2012, we were asked to each write an essay on our expectations and goals. I read mine over in December before I jumped on a plane to Orlando - more on that later.

I wrote in my essay, way back in 2012, a list of promises I would keep if I could just please go to a Learning Session. Paramount on that list was this: "I will listen more than I will speak." Because that's what patients do, right? I had the distinct feeling that I would be an intruder in a place where patients don't belong - and let me be clear that no one in ImproveCareNow made me feel this way; my stereotyped idea of what it meant to be a patient did.

"I will listen more than I will speak." This was my perception: it was okay for patients to sit at the table. To sit, to listen, but to speak? How could I? I was nineteen. I was a patient. What could I possibly have to share?

There is a time for listening, absolutely. But there is also a time for speaking - for all to speak. I had no concept of that as a young patient. I couldn't imagine myself having any sort of expertise that would help improve the healthcare system, even as I navigated it constantly. I figured I'd be there as an observer, to bring back insights to share with other patients about ImproveCareNow's work to help kids recover from, and more so, avoid flares of their IBD. Observer is the word I would have chosen to describe my responsibilities there.

IMG_2301 PAC Co-Chairs, then PAC Scholars, Jennie David (left) and Sami Kennedy (right) at their first ImproveCareNow Learning Session, October 2012.

Since my first Learning Session in the fall of 2012, I have been to five more. At each of them I have listened with a tape recorder running in my mind every second of every day, but I have also come home with a hoarse voice. Observer? No. I am so much more. No one at the Learning Session is just an observer - whether a long-time veteran or a special guest. Look at the buzz generated on Twitter (while you're at it, check out #icncc15s!) if you don't believe me.

I love to tell the story from my second Learning Session. To give you some context I am still nineteen here, and I've never before presented anything, anywhere, outside of a classroom. I was involved in a Q&A after a presentation I co-led with a physician and psychologist on medication adherence. A psychologist, physician, and patient together giving a presentation - I couldn't have imagined that just six months earlier! A physician in the audience posed a question to me regarding how I felt adherence could be effectively encouraged in patients my age. I gave my best answer, and he responded with his opinion based on his experiences, which happened not to be congruent with mine. We conversed for a few minutes; others chimed in. It was fascinating, thrilling, magical; I don't know if I can point to a better real-life definition of active collaboration.

After the session, this same physician hurried up to me at the podium. "I'm sorry," he said.

Wait, he said what?!

"I'm sorry," he said.

I asked him to clarify, very confused, and he explained that he worried he had made me uncomfortable by challenging my opinion as a patient. In fact, he had done just the opposite. This was my ImproveCareNow "lightbulb" moment.

Screen shot 2013-10-25 at 2.42.09 PM Sami (left) with former PAC Chair Jill (right) and ImproveCareNow project coordinator Molly (center) at the Spring 2013 Learning Session.

I have been asked countless times: how did you become who you are, a young patient leader? How do we get our patients to be like you? I am not sure this is the question we should be asking - because it assumes I am extraordinary. I know I am different; I have done things few other patients my age have - but it is not me that is extraordinary. I have been welcomed into an environment where I am encouraged to not only sit at the table, but also to stand up and address the whole room.

ImproveCareNow is an extraordinary community - a community with an ever-growing number of parents and patients being handed the mic - being asked to do things that were never before possible. This physician hadn't made me uncomfortable, no, not at all - he had made me comfortable. Our conversation erased all doubt from my mind that I was there for show; I was there for the same reason as him.

I wish I could convey to you how incredible that felt - and how sad I feel in retrospect that feeling included, truly included, had to feel incredible because it was so unusual.

I told that very story twice in 2014 to two very amazing audiences - first, to executives from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and, second, to healthcare leaders and learners at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement National Forum - the reason I took that flight to Orlando. I presented the Patient Advisory Council to each and, in each case, asked them to imagine collaborating with patients. I told them about the promise I made before my very first Learning Session, and how I have broken it over and over again.

IHI Conference Dec 9 2014 - Sami presentation photo Sami presenting the PAC at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement National Forum in December 2014.

There is a time for listening, and there is a time for speaking. For all to speak, and all to listen.

I found out in the fall I've been accepted to medical school, and I'm still trying to figure out what it will mean for me to be both a patient advocate and a medical student. But here is what I do know: I can't really imagine myself practicing in a system without ImproveCareNow and networks like it that I hope will be just as successful for other conditions. I want to be a physician who makes my younger self proud. One who doesn't just repair broken things, but creates things that are better. One who is brave enough to say and show that everyone has expertise, taking patient and family engagement to the places ImproveCareNow has, where it can be frightening to go. I see networks following in the footsteps of ImproveCareNow as the foundation of how I hope to practice - and how I have to practice. This is not only creating health for kids with IBD; this is making the whole system healthier.

Of course I am scared as I figure out a new set of expectations - but, this time, I don't expect to be silent.


The future of IBD research is in your hands

ImproveCareNow has partnered with Patient PrioritiesThe goal of medical research is to find answers that will improve the lives of patients. But how can we be sure the answers really matter if we don’t ask patients what they want and need to know?

ImproveCareNow is committed to supporting research that represents patient and family perspectives. As part of our funding from the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, we are working with leading health care researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Katherine Bevans, PhD and Chris Forrest, MD, PhD (selected publications by Dr. Forrest) to use new ways to engage everyone in the IBD community in setting our direction for learning. They have created a website called Patient Priorities to find out what YOU want and need to know about Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (IBD). You don’t need any research experience to participate.

You will be asked to recall moments during your/your child’s diagnosis and/or treatment when you wanted more information, or had questions that were not answered. Maybe you had questions when comparing two treatment options, or making the decision to end a particular treatment. Any difficult moment when you needed more clarity and information is important for researchers to know about.

Responses to the 10-minute survey are anonymous and will be grouped with many other responses to develop a list of “Learning Objectives.”  Some Learning Objectives may be answered using existing research. Where there is good research to answer common questions, ImproveCareNow will be making more tools and resources for families available through care centers and in our online communities: Facebook, Twitter, here on LOOP, CIRCLE, the ICN Exchange and Smart Patients. Those Learning Objectives that are unanswered and require more research will be added to the ImproveCareNow research agenda.

We’ve heard from many patients with IBD and their parents. It would be great to hear from many more to be sure the Learning Objectives really represent a wide variety of experiences.

Here’s your survey: http://bit.ly/lrnobjs

This is an important opportunity for us to shape the future of IBD research. We will be sharing our results and what we’ve learned along the way, so you can see how we’re outsmarting IBD together.


The Story of Empowered by Kids

Justin Vandergrift is a co-founder of Empowered by KidsJustin Vandergrift believes when you’re meant to do something, doors will open. But you have to be there when the doorbell rings. You have to open that door. And Justin has opened a lot of doors in his life. He runs multiple companies, volunteers at Levine Children’s Hospital, and has made it his mission to deliver hope and inspiration, information and empowerment to families (just like his) living with a chronic illness – like Crohn’s disease, which his daughter Kathryn has

Crohn’s disease, along with ulcerative colitis, is also known as Inflammatory Bowel Disease or IBD.

I asked Justin to share the story of Empowered by Kids (EBK), the non-profit he co-founded with two other parents (Tania Moon and Julia Ament-Cox), to fast-track the delivery of hope, inspiration, information and empowerment where it’s needed most.

The story begins with an ImproveCareNow (ICN) Learning Session and a greeting card.

At his first Learning Session, Justin remembers Mary Jones from Texas Children’s sharing how she designed a card and filled it with greetings from patients and hand-delivered it to kids with IBD staying on the inpatient floor. It was a huge success.

Justin loved the idea, so he partnered with an aspiring artist and pediatric IBD patient back at Levine to design a card and then filled it with greetings from patients. He printed the cards and added them to the inpatient care kits the Levine support group put together. The response was amazing!



“I remember our Social Worker telling me the cards were the very best part of the care kits!”

 

Building on the success of the greeting cards, Justin and the ICN Parent Working Group hatched a plan for a “Book of Hope” - a collection of stories and greetings from parents and patients with IBD, designed to deliver hope well beyond the walls of a single hospital. Enthusiasm for the project was overwhelming! But it was not clear how to pay for it and what the legal implications might be. Sensing the door closing, Justin turned toward the next.

For his birthday, he wished for nothing more than the support of family and friends, and was overwhelmed by their generosity. Recognizing this as the opportunity to bring Book of Hope to life, he teamed up with Tania Moon and Julia Ament-Cox, whom he had been working closely with on the project, and EBK was born.

 

EBK logo

 

In six short weeks, the trio established EBK as a 501c3 non-profit, launched a website, laid out stories from 25 parents and patients with IBD in the first edition of the Book of Hope, and printed 10,000 copies.

They arrived at the Fall 2013 Learning Session with hope in hand, and blew everyone away as they unveiled the Book of Hope and invited ICN care centers to order as many copies as they needed (free of charge) to give to all patients and families with IBD across the network. Today, Justin estimates over 60% of ICN centers have the Book of Hope in stock. And it is always available for free download online here.

The Book of Hope, like everything EBK creates and shares, is designed for parents and patients, by parents and patients. Everyone at EBK has lived through chronic illness diagnosis, and is still on the journey. Their goal is to make it just a little bit easier for those that come after them by sharing tools and information that empower patients and parents to ask good questions and make good decisions; by providing hope and inspiration as a constant reminder that no one is in this alone; and by bringing together a community of people who will continue to support, inspire, educate and empower one another.

Ding Dong…Ding Dong…

Do you hear that? It’s a doorbell ringing. Go ahead open the door. Connect with EBK. They’ve been waiting for you! Here are a few ways to connect:

 

M Troy Tweet EBK

 

In case you’re wondering, Justin still listens for the doorbell. Here’s a sneak peek at some of the EBK doors that will be opening soon.

  • Hope on Demand, an iOS app delivering hope to your apple device
  • Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Book of Hope - Winter 2014
  • EBK IBD Podcasts, combining ICN center highlights, opportunities and best practices

 


Gutsy 3 & 4 Take On The Learning Session!

As this year's PAC Scholars Bianca and I (Isabelle) got to go to the 2014 Fall Learning Session in Chicago. We had such a great time and just wanted to share some of our thoughts about the LS before, during and afterwards!The 2014-15 PAC Scholars Bianca & Isabelle

Before:


Isabelle: Leading up to the Learning session I was so excited! There were so many texts and e-mails and many plans to be made (plane tickets, hotel rooms, and most importantly snack choices). As it got closer I was a little nervous, as I am the only one of the PAC representatives who had never been to a Learning Session before, but mostly I was just so excited to see/meet my fellow PAC leaders and so many others!

Bianca: Before the Learning Session I was super excited to see everyone again and be able to meet my fellow PAC Scholar, Isabelle! Since I had already been to a few Learning Sessions, I knew what to expect (how busy it is, the amount of new people I would be meeting,etc.), but I was looking forward to working on a different level with the PAC. Before the Learning Session, I got to help out with the pre-work. "Grading" each center's vision for their ideal treatment center and picking my favorites was a lot of fun. I loved reading how big every center's dreams were for their own perfect IBD center.

During:


Isabelle: I met so many interesting people. It was so amazing how nice and down-to-earth everyone was, including the big-shot doctors. They all introduced themselves by their first names and seemed genuinely interested in hearing about where I go to school, what I am studying and my dreams for my future and the future of the PAC. There were many planning sessions with just the PAC and it really got me excited about our future projects and being in the Learning Session environment helped make those projects feel connected to a larger purpose.

Bianca: During the Learning Session, I met so many more people than I had anticipated! It was great to be able to formally meet everyone and see how passionate each and every center is. I also got to spend a lot of time with Isabelle, Jennie, and Sami, which was awesome to get to know them on a different level, rather than throught text/emails. The past few Learning Sessions I had been to were nice and helpful, but I like to be more involved, so this Learning Session was by far the best!

After:


Isabelle: I made so many connections and learned a lot about ICN at the Learning Session. It was a lot to take in but I really enjoyed the entire event and can’t wait to go back again, this time with even more knowledge heading into it. Meeting my fellow PAC leaders Jennie and Bianca and of course seeing Sami again was so much fun and I feel like I am so close with all of them already. I am very excited for our future and the future of ICN!

Bianca: Afterwards, I was beyond excited for what this year would bring. This LS was great becuase, like I said, I got to spend a lot of time with the PAC leadership, being introduced into the PAC leadership position, setting goals, ordering room service, and just hanging out with each other.  Though the few days were fun and enjoyable, things did get hectic at times, but overall a great, well spent, work filled weekend. I cannot wait until the next LS, because the experience of each Learning Session is like no other - the connections made, the work being done, and of course the laughs and tears shared. I am beyond excited for this year!


I wish I knew _______ about IBD.

Speak out. Tell ImproveCareNow what IBD questions need to be answered.


What do you wish you knew about Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis? Do you have questions about diagnosis or treatment options? What about daily management of IBD? Maybe you've wondered if a certain drug or lifestyle change would help. These are important questions! The answers could have an incredible impact on your life, the life of your child, the lives of many patients living with IBD.

ImproveCareNow is ready to answer your important questions – but we need you to tell us what they are!


Patient Priorities IBD Learning Priorities ProjectTeens and young adults with IBD, and their parents and clinicians are invited to participate in the IBD Learning Priorities Project - a study being conducted in partnership with Patient Priorities. Participants will be asked to share questions and concerns about IBD, and it's treatment, management, etc. in a confidential survey. The results will be used to create a list of the top learning objectives for ImproveCareNow to focus on.

Speak out! Tell us what you need to know. Go to patientpriorities.com to complete your brief survey, now.


← Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12    18  19  Next →

Built by Veracity Media on NationBuilder